More Coverage Of NLRB Attack On American Business

Bring Federal Labor Law Into The 21st Century

These trends became evident at the same time that union leaders had unlimited access to what were most likely their most sympathetic president and Congress ever, in great part because the labor chieftains spent nearly half a billion dollars on behalf of Democratic incumbents and candidates in the 2006 and 2008 elections. With President Obama and a Democratic Congress, unions appeared certain to get their No. 1 legislative priority — card check, which would have abolished secret ballots in workplace organizing elections. With card check as law and Obama putting labor favorites in all the key positions at the Department of Labor and National Labor Relations Board, surely the decline in union membership would be reversed.

Ex-Labor Board Chairman: Union-Backed Case Against Boeing ‘Unprecedented’

The former chairman of the National Labor Relations Board told FoxNews.com that a board attorney’s bid to stop Boeing from opening a production line at a non-union site in South Carolina is “unprecedented” and could have serious implications for companies looking to expand.

Will Unions Clip Boeing’s Wings?

So they, in the form of the International Association of Machinists, have called upon their wholly owned subsidiary, the National Labor Relations Board — whose job it is to bully business on labor’s behalf — to file a complaint against Boeing for expanding into the right-to-work state of South Carolina.

Right-To-Work States Bullied

Now dominated by President Barack Obama’s union-friendly appointees, the NLRB has filed a complaint against Boeing, which is about to open a new manufacturing facility for its 787 Dreamliner passenger aircraft in South Carolina, a right-to-work state. The agency contends it should build the planes in Washington state, where it already operates a unionized Dreamliner-manufacturing plant.

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